Posts Tagged ‘Tlingit’

Artist of the moment……..Keith Wolfe Smarch

 

 

Keith Wolfe Smarch is a Tlingit artist specializing in carvings and masks. Keith Wolfe Smarch is from the community of Teslin, Yukon, Canada. It is a very small city of less than 500 residents.

Keith Wolfe Smarch was born in the year 1961.

In this clip we view an interview where Keith Wolfe Smarch talks about carving canoes and walking sticks:

The artist received inspiration and knowledge from legendary Tlingit and Thaltan carver Dempsey Bob.

The works that Keith Wolfe Smarch  carves represent the knowledge he has learned about his Tlingit cultural background and history.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

In this clip a brief interview with Keith Wolfe Smarch:

Keith Wolfe Smarch has spent time living in Japan.

Below a link to the website of the artist:

http://keithwolfesmarch.com/

What a great example of contemporary First Nations art.

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Artist of the moment…….Wayne Price

 

 

Wayne Price is a First Nations artist representing the Tlingit.

Wayne Price was born in   Price is a master of many mediums and creates totem poles, masks, hats, jewelry, and canoes.

In this clip Price explains some of his creative process:

In this clip the artist shares with us how to make a fantastic canoe:

Price is now based out of Haines, Alaska. He helps to direct young people to the exciting world of art.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

Below a link to the website of Wayne Price:

http://silvercloudart.com/home

This  is a very skilled artist capable of expressing himself using any means necessary.

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Artist of the moment………Nathan Jackson

 

 

Nathan Jackson is a First Nations artist representing the Sockeye clan of the Chilkoot Tlingit people. Nathan Jackson was born in 1938. Jackson renown for his totem poles but like many First Nations artists is capable of working in any size and any medium.

The artist served in the military.

When he was a young man Jackson began a career as a commercial fisherman. He became ill with pneumonia and spent time in hospital and was unable to fish. During this time he began carving small totem poles.

Jackson attended the Institute of the American Indian Arts located in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

The artist is also a wonderful teacher and educator who enjoys passing on his skills and sense of culture to the younger generation.

Jackson is the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

He and his family live in Ketchikan, Alaska.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

 

Below an interview with Nathan Jackson that took place in 1976:

Jackson is a very accomplished artist in any medium he chooses.

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Artist of the moment……Eugene Alfred

 

Eugene Alfred is a Five Nations artist who is a master sculptor and wonderful printmaker.  Eugene Alfred was born in the year 1970.

Alfred represents the Tlingit Crow clan of the Selkirk First  Nations Group.

The artist uses wood as his main medium.

A large influence on Eugene Alfred was another First Nations artist member, Dempsey Bob, also of the Tlingit tribe.

The artist produces mainly masks, bowls, spoons, and panels that celebrate his culture.

Alfred is based out of Pelly Crossing, Yukon, Canada. A census taken in 2008 had the city with a population of around 300 people.

price range information: Works range from $2,000 to $20,000.

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Artist of the moment…..Preston Singletary

 

Preston Singletary was born in San Francisco, California in the year 1963. Singletary attended the Pilchuck Glass School located in Stanwood, Washington.

The artist is also part of the teaching staff at the Pilchuck School of Glass.

Preston Singletary represents the Tlingit Nation.

In this clip a short interview with Preston Singletary talking about the Tlingit culture found in his work:

The artist is included in many prominent collections including the American Institute of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Price range information: His favorite subject is a large barrel shaped basket work of blown glass with most ranging from $3,000 to $5,000. Larger masks can reach as high as $20,000.

What I enjoy most about Singletary’s masks is the fact they are made out of glass. Like a spirit appearing in the night, Preston Singletary’s work really looks its best when it is hit by light that makes the transparency and the interesting shapes come to life.

This clip was just released a few days ago, a newer updated interview with the artist. We get to see him at work on some pieces:

 

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Artist of the moment…..Teri Rofkar

Teri Rofkar is a wonderful contemporary artist from Sitka, Alaska  renown for her work with fabrics. Teri Rofkar was born in the year 1956. The artist produces hand woven garments and baskets of traditional and historical significance. To  weave one of these ornamental masterpiece garments it sometimes takes up to 2,000 hours of time (and more importantly patience!)

price range information: Sorry none available.

Teri Rofkar is one of few people to receive an endowment from the National Arts Foundation in order to improve her basket weaving in the Tinglet traditional style. The recipients of this award are known as living national treasures! What a great idea! I think many of the Northwest Coast artists deserve more exposure. Rofkar received this extraordinary grant in 2009.

Calls herself a “basket case” because she is weaving or gathering materials all of the time!

In this clip she talks about learning to weave from grandmother and her parents. She talks about her working environment in her art:

In this clip we view some works from Rofkar and Shelly Laws. Both are nationally collected artists that work in the traditional Tlingit ways of weaving and basketry.

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