Posts Tagged ‘lithographs’

Artist of the moment….Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela has been everywhere the past few days, but lets take a look at some wonderful artwork he produced back in the early 2000s. Mandela was incarcerated for nearly 3 decades on Robbin Island.

For this series that depicts many locations of his surroundings, he made 20 images.

As an artist I find he has a great sense of design. He left out so many shapes and put  in only the essentials. Imagine how many items are actually in a prison cell. But his cell looks empty and lifeless.

I also find his printmaking style interesting. Many artists that did illustration in the golden age of illustration used a method of paint and charcoal, sometimes allowing the charcoal to show through.  Mandela used a black crayon for his outline. The lines aren’t the boring and straight as you would expect, but they have nice uneven weight to them, making them far more exciting than one might normally think.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

Its great to see a great person making great art! Another artist who made great work at an advanced age!

This link has further detail on his Robben Island series. A brief background about each image is given:

http://www.nelsonmandelaart.com/my-robben-island—series-i.html

To close we take a look at my favorite work of art that uses Mandela as a subject. This work is done by an artist who uses laser cut wood and steel to make wonderful sculptures. His name is Marco Cianfanelli.

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Artist of the moment…..Fritz Scholder

Fritz Scholder was born in Breckenridge, Minnesota in the year 1937. His father was Indian and Scholder took great pride in this aspect of his heritage. Scholder came to prominence as a  painter whilst living in Sante Fe, New Mexico.

Scholder was able to study with a well known Native American painter named Oscar Howe. Howe worked with the figure in a very abstract manner. Much like a Bev Doolittle painting, the figures are cleverly hidden amongst the very abstract design. Here is an example of Oscar Howe’s style.

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For his collegiate studies Scholder attended many colleges including Wisconsin State University, Sacramento City College where he studied under Wayne Thiebaud, and the University of Arizona where he earned a master’s degree. Thiebaud asked his young charge to exhibit in a cooperative gallery. Scholder was an immediate success. After earning his masters degree Scholder joined the teaching faculty at the Institute of American Indian Arts. He moved to Sante Fe, New Mexico. Scholder did a series of paintings featuring the Native American Indian. The paintings were seen as an insult to many and Scholder was only one quarter Indian and painted his idea of the Indian and American cultures coming together. Scholder wanted to visit Europe and quit his teaching post. After his travels abroad Scholder returned to Sante Fe.
Scholder produced etchings, drawings, paintings, and sculpture. His first lithographs were made during the early 1970s, he was quite prolific as a print artist.

Received great reviews from the Smithsonian show featuring Scholder and his famed student T.C. Cannon.I profiled Cannon within the past week, Cannon had a style very similar to R.C. Gorman, but died in car crash before the opening of this show.

In the early 1980s he moved to Manhattan, New York.

price range information: Oils range $10,000 to $50,000. Acrylics $4,000 to $50,000. Bronzes range $500 to $2000. Lithographs can be found for less than one thousand dollars.

Exhibited his art at the Grand Palais in France. Also had shows in Romania, Yugoslavia, Berlin, and London.

Scholder enjoyed books and even loved to his name in print. He often mentioned once his name was in the books to be used later for reference material (like this website which is geared to show people that artists all over the world are not starving and desolate!) Fritz Scholder would have a permanent place in the world of art history. Scholder even had a book with some of his poetry published.

Scholder passed away in 2005 at the age of 67.

In this clip see an excerpt from a documentary film about Fritz Scholder.

A great montage of works by Fritz Scholder.