Posts Tagged ‘Kwakwaka’wakw’

Artist of the moment…….Erich Glendale

 

 

Erich Glendale is a First Nations artist born in Campbell River, British Columbia, Canada in the year 1972. Campbell River is a coastal city on the east coast of Vancouver Island. The artist represents the Kwakwaka’wakw Tribe of the Family of First Nations.

Glendale produces the traditional cultural items of First Nation’s Art including rattles, bowls, walking sticks, masks, and jewelry.

Price range information: Works range from $500 for jewelry up to $8,000 for large carvings such as masks.

The artist began carving in the 1990s.

Glendale’s favorite medium to carve with is a cedar. Glendale works mainly with yellow cedar but occasionally carves red cedar.

The artist sometimes works with other mediums including gold and silver.

My favorite works of this artist are his rattles of creatures of the sea. What detail and imagination!

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Artist of the moment………..Rande Cook

 

Rande Cook is a contemporary First Nations artist whose style blends classic native design innovative color and shapes. Rande Cook was born in Alert Bay which is located on Vancouver Island, Canada in the year 1977.

In this clip a brief interview with Rande Cook:

Cook works as a printmaker, painter, sculptor. Cook is also an outstanding jewelry designer.

Rande Cook represents the Kwakwaka’wakw people of the First Nations people.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

The artist now lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Cook has been inspired by other First Nations artist including Beau Dick, Don Yeomans, Susan Point, and Richard Hunt. The artist served as an apprentice to First Nations artist John Livingston. Cook gives Livingston a great deal of credit for teaching him carving and giving him a basis in the design of First Nations art.

Cook is a great example of the more modernist style of First Nations art we find in younger artists. The traditional dominant colors of black and red are used by Cook his art, but with the addition of bright colors including fantastic blues and yellows the viewer eye moves around the picture space constantly seeing a new image and unique color combinations not found in more traditional First Nations art.

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Artist of the moment…….Joe Wilson

 

 

Joe Wilson is a First Nations artist representing the Kwakwaka’ wakw people. Joe Wilson was born in Alert Bay, Canada in the year 1966.

The artist had loved to create since he was a young man and became inspired by taking a course from another First Nations artist named Douglas Cranmer. The course was a birthday present from his sister. Way to go sis!

Wilson was mentored by two other First Nations artist profiled here Wayne Alfred and Beau Dick.

Many of his masks are a combination of cedar and horse hair.

Price range information: sorry none available.

An added note, if you ever visit the Denver Art Museum be sure and check out the fifth floor where you can see many of the First Nations artists profiled here and also a few Inuit works.

Wilson has a knack for giving his masks a real sense of life. His printmaking skills show a wonderful sense of design and use of color. My favorite prints are the ones that include two First Nations symbols such as thunderbird and killer whale.

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Artist of the moment……..Patrick Hunt

 

 

Patrick Hunt comes from family of multiple generations of artists and was born in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada in the year 1966.

Hunt is the grandson of hereditary chief George Hunt.

Having only recently seen First Nations art for the first time its important to see the sculptures and carvings in person. So many considerations are taken into account by the artist when the work is viewed from a position other than straight on. The viewer not only sees the outstanding carving, but when viewed from the sides the viewer is exposed to many geometric shapes and fantastic color.

For most works made by Patrick Hunt he uses a combination of wood, feathers, paint, and horse hair.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

Brother Tom Hunt is also a professional artist.

Of the First Nations artists profiled here he reminds me of Beau Dick, who was a master at carving two faces on one head.

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Artist of the moment…….Bruce Alfred

 

Bruce Alfred is an outstanding artist born in Alert Bay, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada in the year 1950.

Alfred was able to study under prominent Five Nations artists Richard Hunt and Don Cranmer.

One of the favorite mediums of Alfred is his production of wooden boxes. These boxes are often carved from red cedar.

Alfred enjoys soccer and was an avid player in his community.

The artist was one of Five Nations artists featured in a 1980 exhibition that brought Northwest Coast Art back into the international art scene.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

Here we view Bruce Alfred presenting one of his signature boxes to a regional historical government house:

The artist has produced commissioned works for a cultural museum in his area.

In this clip a brief interview with Bruce Alfred as he receives an award for his outstanding creativity!:

 

Alfred represents the Kwakwaka’wakw Nation. The current population of the Kwakwaka’wakw is around 5,500.

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Artist of the moment……Wayne Alfred

Wayne Alfred was born in Alert Bay which is located on Vancouver Island, Canada in the year 1958. Alfred is renown for his carvings of masks. Wayne Alfred represents the Kwakwaka’wakw tribe of First Nations of Canada.

The artist has seven siblings.

Moved to Vancouver, British Columbia in 1986 when he was commissioned to help carve a large totem pole for Stanley Park. For those of you who haven’t visited Vancouver, Stanley Park is the second largest public park in North America behind Central Park located in New York City. This commission was completed with the help of artist Beau Dick.

Price range information: Works range from $1,000 to $10,000. Alfred produces carvings and also jewelry.

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Artist of the moment….Northwest Coast artist John Livingston

John Livingston is a Northwest Coast artist who wasn’t born into a tribe, but rather adopted by one. Livingston was born in 1951.

Based out of Vancouver, British Columbia.

In this work he talks about his work with human face and the sun. I love hearing about artists talk about their work:

The artist learned to carve by watching masters Tony and Henry Hunt. The father and son and taken over for Mungo Martin as the lead carvers at the Thunderbird Park carving program.

Livingston works in a very large format and has received many commissions. On some works he has done collaborations with other notable artists including Robert Davidson.

Has worked on nearly 30 very large traditional totem poles, hand carved since he began his career in the 1960s. These very large works are usually made to celebrate a particular time or celebration.

price range information: sorry none available.

In the tradition of art in their close knit community, only certain clans could work with certain imagery. Northwest Coast art was only to be made by its native peoples. Livingston though not a tribe member, was adopted by the Kwakaka’ wakw tribe and is allowed to practice their design and motif works.

 

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