Posts Tagged ‘interment camp’

Artist of the moment…………Roger Shimomura

 

Roger Shimomura has something in common with previous post Mine Okuba, Roger Shimomura also spent time as a detainee in a Japanese American interment camp. In other works Shimomura paints in a Pop art manner. Cartoony, but not as modernist as manga art.

Price range information: The artist produces silkscreen prints and also original art painted in acrylics. No price information available.

Below a link to the website of artist Roger Shimomura:

http://www.rshim.com/

Roger Shimomura was born in Seattle, Washington in the year 1939. Shimomura attended the University of Washington where he earned a B.F.A. The artist went on to earn an MFA from Syracuse University.

In this clip we view the show where I first saw Roger Shimomura’s work, at the Missoula, Montana Art Museum. Works and an interview are shown here:

The artist has worked as part an professor of art and the University of Kansas located in Lawrence, Kansas. He taught from 1969 until 2004.

I think its great that this artist and Mine Okubo have done wonderful paintings on feelings they experienced as a child. Even though its a tough and difficult subject matter, as the artist said himself, we can’t just erase the experience from our memories.

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Artist of the moment……….Mine Okubo

 

Mine Okubo was an American artist renown for her paintings and drawings made around the period of World War 2, which showed what life was like for Japanese Americans living in internment camps. Mine Okuba was born in Riverside, California in the year 1912. Okubo also worked with the figure in a modern style.

The artist worked with casein, watercolor, and acrylic.

In this clip a fellow internee talks about his relationship with Mine Okubo. Also many works are shown:

Price range information: Sorry none available.

Okuba attended the University of California at Berkley.

Her book that dealt with these events was titled Citizen 13660. The book contained more than 2,000 works of art dedicated to this topic.

After being released early from her camp, Okubo moved to New York City.

Mine Okubo passed away in 2001.

I find it great that the Okubo was able to make such great work depicting such a horrible event.

 

 

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