Posts Tagged ‘first nations art’

Artist of the moment……David Boxley

 

 

David Boxley is a Amerian First Nations carver representing the Tsimshian. David Boxley was born in Alaska in the year 1952. Boxley has produced prints but is more known for his wall panels, rattles, masks, and talking sticks.

Boxley was raised by his grandparents. The artist attended Seattle Pacific University where he earned a degree in science. After his college career Boxley became a teacher and basketball coach spending time in the state of Washington and his home state of Alaska.

Boxley became serious about art in 1979. At this time he began to study his First Nations artistic roots. In 1986 he decided to quit teaching and became a full time professional artist.

During the 1990 Goodwill Games Boxley was commissioned to create work that showed a peaceful relationship between Russia and United States.

Below a brief interview with David Boxley:

The artist is now based out of Metlakatla, Alaska.

Below a link to the website of the artist. ( A great website with many pictures!):

http://www.davidboxley.com/

Price range information: Sorry none available.

Boxley is part of many prestigious collections of countries all around the world. In this clip we view a totem pole that can be found at the National Museum of the American Indian located in Washington D.C.:

Boxley has a sense of classic First Nations design blended with a modernist use of color. If you ever have the chance to see First Nation’s art, in particular the masks, the color of these masks are remarkable.

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Artist of the moment…….Erich Glendale

 

 

Erich Glendale is a First Nations artist born in Campbell River, British Columbia, Canada in the year 1972. Campbell River is a coastal city on the east coast of Vancouver Island. The artist represents the Kwakwaka’wakw Tribe of the Family of First Nations.

Glendale produces the traditional cultural items of First Nation’s Art including rattles, bowls, walking sticks, masks, and jewelry.

Price range information: Works range from $500 for jewelry up to $8,000 for large carvings such as masks.

The artist began carving in the 1990s.

Glendale’s favorite medium to carve with is a cedar. Glendale works mainly with yellow cedar but occasionally carves red cedar.

The artist sometimes works with other mediums including gold and silver.

My favorite works of this artist are his rattles of creatures of the sea. What detail and imagination!

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Artist of the moment……..Keith Wolfe Smarch

 

 

Keith Wolfe Smarch is a Tlingit artist specializing in carvings and masks. Keith Wolfe Smarch is from the community of Teslin, Yukon, Canada. It is a very small city of less than 500 residents.

Keith Wolfe Smarch was born in the year 1961.

In this clip we view an interview where Keith Wolfe Smarch talks about carving canoes and walking sticks:

The artist received inspiration and knowledge from legendary Tlingit and Thaltan carver Dempsey Bob.

The works that Keith Wolfe Smarch  carves represent the knowledge he has learned about his Tlingit cultural background and history.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

In this clip a brief interview with Keith Wolfe Smarch:

Keith Wolfe Smarch has spent time living in Japan.

Below a link to the website of the artist:

http://keithwolfesmarch.com/

What a great example of contemporary First Nations art.

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Artist of the moment………..Francis Horne Senior

 

 

Francis Horne Sr. is a self taught first nations artist renown for his work with masks and totem poles. Francis Horne was born in Mount Vernon, Washington in the year 1954.

Horne represents is a member of the First Nations family the Coast Salish.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

The artist began carving in 1973.

Horne, in a similar manner of the Inuit people, sometimes uses items in his work that cannot be removed from Canada such as whalebone. Make sure to review your mask or totem from this artist to make sure it can be shipped to your house!

I enjoy the animated qualities and sense of life that comes through the masks and totem poles of this artist.

The artist is now based out of Fraser Valley, British Columbia, Canada.

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Artist of the moment………..Rande Cook

 

Rande Cook is a contemporary First Nations artist whose style blends classic native design innovative color and shapes. Rande Cook was born in Alert Bay which is located on Vancouver Island, Canada in the year 1977.

In this clip a brief interview with Rande Cook:

Cook works as a printmaker, painter, sculptor. Cook is also an outstanding jewelry designer.

Rande Cook represents the Kwakwaka’wakw people of the First Nations people.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

The artist now lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Cook has been inspired by other First Nations artist including Beau Dick, Don Yeomans, Susan Point, and Richard Hunt. The artist served as an apprentice to First Nations artist John Livingston. Cook gives Livingston a great deal of credit for teaching him carving and giving him a basis in the design of First Nations art.

Cook is a great example of the more modernist style of First Nations art we find in younger artists. The traditional dominant colors of black and red are used by Cook his art, but with the addition of bright colors including fantastic blues and yellows the viewer eye moves around the picture space constantly seeing a new image and unique color combinations not found in more traditional First Nations art.

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Artist of the moment……………Shaun Peterson

 

Shaun Peterson is a wonderful First Nations artist born in Puyallup, Washington in the year 1975.

The artist began his art career after high school. Peterson has been able to study right alongside contemporary First Nations artists George David, and Steve Brown.

Below a link to the website of Shaun Peterson:

http://www.qwalsius.com/

A big moment in Shaun Peterson’s life came when he was given the name of his Great Grandfather, Qwalsius.

What I enjoy most about Shaun Peterson is that he is very honest about his view of the art world, and he hopes to change it. The artist expresses in his artistic statement that when people think of Indian Art it most likely is black or red and traditional.

I know as a reader of this site you know that is not the case! Many bright First Nations artists are making modern additions to traditional art and even mass marketing some of their art on clothing.

Below we hear from the artist in his own words:

The artist reminds us that the basis of the logo of the Seattle Seahawks national football league team is based on a First Nations style bird. Peterson shows a works based on this idea below:

price range information: Sorry none available.

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Artist of the moment……..Alano Edzerza

 

Alano Edzerza is a First Nations artist renown for his prints of wildlife. Edzerza is also an outstanding entrepreneur who has brought the First Nations art into commercial apparel. Imagine wearing your favorite first nations art design as a dress, this is possible thanks to the vision of Alano Edzerza.

The artist attended school in Arizona where he learned to work with jewelry. He has also studied with many artists in private settings.

Edzerza was born in the year 1981 and has been making art his entire life.

 

Edzerza represents the Raven clan of First Nations Tahltan people.

In this clip we visit the artist in his studio and see how he lives on a daily basis:

In 2010, the artist secured a deal to design the wear for the Dutch Winter Olympic Sports Team.

Edzerza loves giving back to the community and has helped with local programs that help younger artists to succeed as artists and business people.

Price range information: Sorry none available.

What I enjoy most about his artwork is his sense of close up depictions of his work. When I first saw his work I imagined Andy Warhol might paint something so large in scale with such a limited palette if he worked in the First Nations style of design. Its great to see such art and designs finally making it the widespread consumer market.

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