Artist of the moment……Norman Tait

 

Norman Tait is a Northwest Coast artist born in Kincolith, British Columbia, Canada in the year 1941. Tait is well schooled in many mediums including carving masks, totem poles, printmaking, and even making jewelry.

Tait has even completed a commission for the British Royal Family at Bushy Park located in London, England.

Some other locations where Norman Tait has carved totem poles are the British Columbia Museum of Anthropology and also Stanley Park. For those of you not lucky enough to visit Vancouver, Stanley Park is the second largest park in North America behind Central Park in New York City.

The artist works with the Nisga’a culture and society. Tait is seen as the best artist working with Nisga’a culture.

Norman Tait also has a nephew, Ron Telek, who is a professional carver/artist.

Norman Tait also had a son who was an outstanding artist born in 1965 named Isaac Tait. Isaac Tait was born in Canada but eventually wound up in Sante Fe where he taught at the Institute of American Indian Arts. Below an example of Isaac Tait’s art. Isaac Tait passed away in 2000.

issac

Norman Tait sometimes works with a fellow artist named Lucinda Turner making intricate masks and carvings. Below an example of a collaborative effort from the pair of artists.

mix

Price range information:  Works range from $1,000 to $25,000.

Yet another fantastic family of artists!

D

3 Comments »

  1. Valerie Tait Said:

    Thank you for this tribute. Sadly all three have since passed. Norman Tait (d. 2016). Ron Telek (d. 2016).

    Other notable artists of same family; brother Alver Tait. brother Robert “Chip” Tait (d. 2018). Nephew Wayne Young (2012).

  2. Valerie Tait Said:

    Awesome tribute piece. Sadly all three have since passed. Norman Tait, May 21 2016, Ron Telek, Jan 2017. Robert Chip Tait, June 10 2018. Wayne Young, 2013.

    All masterful carvers taught by my father, Norman.

    Respectfully,
    Valerie Tait

    • diattaart1 Said:

      I am hoping the Denver Art Museum purchases more Inuit and First Nation’s Art. Their collection at the current time is very small. Thanks for your input!


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